Pacific Rim

Pacific Rim is a good movie. A really, really fucking good movie. Whatever you thought of it, it is that and so much more. Hell, it even made me tear up during a certain father-son moment that I will not discuss any further. But for all of that, that’s not what stuck with me the most about it. That’s not what made this movie unique when so many fail. To explain what made it so good, and so cool, I first have to explain what it means to be an Infantryman.

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It was pointed out to me today that my bracelet has taken a bit of abuse, and it reminded me that I have been wearing this thing for seven years now. Somehow, despite having worn it for seven years, I managed to forget that the anniversary was three days ago.
I have often wondered why I still wear this thing even though I didn’t know him as well as I should have and even though I wasn’t out on patrol when he was killed. The best answer I can find for it is this: he was a good man. It seems a shame to see him reduced to just another face amongst a sea of faces or to see him used as another number in an argument. It seems that so many people simply want to reduce the dead to a name or a statistic and forget that there was ever a person behind it. That they had hopes and dreams, or that they were good people who deserved better. 
And, in a world of people who don’t care enough to remember, it somehow seems blasphemous to not pay respect to that memory in some way - to let go of that ghost and forget it was ever there at all. So I carry that ghost with me. One of many, I suppose.
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
800
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
4mm

It was pointed out to me today that my bracelet has taken a bit of abuse, and it reminded me that I have been wearing this thing for seven years now. Somehow, despite having worn it for seven years, I managed to forget that the anniversary was three days ago.

I have often wondered why I still wear this thing even though I didn’t know him as well as I should have and even though I wasn’t out on patrol when he was killed. The best answer I can find for it is this: he was a good man. It seems a shame to see him reduced to just another face amongst a sea of faces or to see him used as another number in an argument. It seems that so many people simply want to reduce the dead to a name or a statistic and forget that there was ever a person behind it. That they had hopes and dreams, or that they were good people who deserved better. 

And, in a world of people who don’t care enough to remember, it somehow seems blasphemous to not pay respect to that memory in some way - to let go of that ghost and forget it was ever there at all. So I carry that ghost with me. One of many, I suppose.

Books and DRM

One common example people like to use when arguing the DRM is that of physical books. By illustrating the absurdity of adding any sort of DRM features such as identity validation or restricted access to books they hope to use it as an allegory for why DRM itself makes no sense on physical products. 

The problem with this argument is the fundamental differences between books and the products DRM are applied to.

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Video Games Do Matter

Every so often I run into someone who thinks that video games don’t matter, that they are just trivial pieces of fluff that really don’t mean anything  in the big scheme of things. While this may be true for some, the truth is that people are complicated and that people are more than capable of finding meaning and forming emotional connections with just about anything. While I know a number of people who have found strong emotional ties to video games, often to specific moments, I generally think these ties wind up being held secret for fear of reprisal and for fear of external judgement. The world is kind of a shitty place so I entirely understand why people do this - if for no other reason that I am generally that person too. 

Fortunately, I am in a unique position of not only giving precisely zero fucks what the world thinks of me, but also having an abundance of emotional burdens that I need to give up. As a result, I’m going to take a few moments and wax poetic about how a video game changed my life for the better, and what it means to me today.

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For many years I thought that Apple’s “Think Different” campaign was a load of shit, and for many years had simply forgotten that it existed. Age is funny though. Somewhere in the 16 years since it was introduced I changed. I went from being someone who just went through life only doing what I was supposed to be doing to someone who recognizes many flaws in the status quo and actively wants to change it.
Somewhere in there this simple marketing fluff actually started meaning something to me. Maybe it’s because I have been called crazy by my peers for not being content to follow the path laid out. Or maybe it’s because I’ve been called a troublemaker for trying to do the right thing when it wasn’t convenient. Maybe it’s the fact that I would not be where I am today if I had listened to them, or had chosen to take the safe route instead of risking it all trying to be different.
Or maybe it’s just the fact I now recognize the simple truth that society is pushed forward by people who refuse to be bound by the way things are because they see the potential for the world to be so much more than it is.Either way, I have grown to respect the philosophy at work here. And for what it’s worth, I have encountered a lot of people in the OS X and iOS developer community who not only believe this, but have lived their lives according to it. I’ve also seen a lot of Apple employees who live and work by a philosophy not to dissimilar from this.It might just be marketing fluff, but these days it means a lot to me. Every now and then I forget that, but I usually wind up coming back to it eventually.
Camera
SONY DSC-W30
ISO
80
Aperture
f/2.8
Exposure
1/40th
Focal Length
6mm

For many years I thought that Apple’s “Think Different” campaign was a load of shit, and for many years had simply forgotten that it existed. Age is funny though. Somewhere in the 16 years since it was introduced I changed. I went from being someone who just went through life only doing what I was supposed to be doing to someone who recognizes many flaws in the status quo and actively wants to change it.

Somewhere in there this simple marketing fluff actually started meaning something to me. Maybe it’s because I have been called crazy by my peers for not being content to follow the path laid out. Or maybe it’s because I’ve been called a troublemaker for trying to do the right thing when it wasn’t convenient. Maybe it’s the fact that I would not be where I am today if I had listened to them, or had chosen to take the safe route instead of risking it all trying to be different.

Or maybe it’s just the fact I now recognize the simple truth that society is pushed forward by people who refuse to be bound by the way things are because they see the potential for the world to be so much more than it is.

Either way, I have grown to respect the philosophy at work here. And for what it’s worth, I have encountered a lot of people in the OS X and iOS developer community who not only believe this, but have lived their lives according to it. I’ve also seen a lot of Apple employees who live and work by a philosophy not to dissimilar from this.

It might just be marketing fluff, but these days it means a lot to me. Every now and then I forget that, but I usually wind up coming back to it eventually.

New look, new site.

In an effort to realign some of my social media stuff, I’ve swapped the backend for this blog in order to separate out my technical and professional writing from my more personal presence. Right now this is slightly empty, but more is on it’s way.

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